Frequently Asked Questions

Family/Marital Law

 


Almost all marriages begin with love, hope, and faith.  However, today one in three marriages ends in divorce for a variety of reasons.  The information provided on this website is intended to educate the public on the South Carolina laws that affect marriages and families. 

Kimberly Dunham

 


The ending of a marriage is a very difficult time for Husbands, Wives, and their minor children.  My goal is to guide my clients through the divorce process in a professional and expeditious manner.  My office truly cares about our clients and the problems they face. Clients involved in family law disputes need both personal and professional support through times that are highly emotional, but require calm and reasoned decision-making. 

When you face divorce or custody issues, you need to retain an attorney who is committed to protecting your rights as an individual and parent.  It is imperative that you consult with an attorney if you are thinking of separating.  Too often people fail too protect themselves and their children, because they simply do not understand South Carolina law and their rights during a divorce proceeding. 

I believe that it is best if the parties can reach an agreement on the issues relating to their action and we provide services in drafting and approving settlement agreements.  However if the parties are unable to reach an agreement I am knowledgeable, skilled, and aggressive.  I have over ten years experience practicing exclusively in Family Law and have won many difficult custody and alimony cases. 



Kimberly Dunham, Attorney at Law

 
 
What are the grounds for a Divorce in the State of South Carolina? We have four fault grounds; adultery, habitual drunkenness (which includes drug abuse), physical cruelty and desertion.  Learn More...

How Long does it take to get a Divorce? The law provides that a final hearing can be held in a fault ground divorce case 90 days after the filing of an action.  Learn More...

Can men really win custody? There used to be a law in the State of South Carolina that was called the Tender Years Doctrine, which in essence said young children should be with their mother’s.  Learn More...

What is standard visitation? Most counties have what is called standard visitation. Learn More...

How is Child Support Determined? In the State of South Carolina we utilize the Department of Social Services Guidelines, which is a formula which looks at the parent’s gross monthly income and gives parents credits for certain expenditures such as work related daycare expenses.  Learn More...


 

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